Earth System Modeling

Optimizing emerging high-performance computing and information technologies, the Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program concentrates on advancing coupled climate and Earth system models for climate change projections at global-to-regional spatial scales and temporal scales spanning decadal to centennial. The ESM program focuses on research that improves representations in specific model components to achieve credible high-resolution climate simulations that address the variability and predictability of climate system changes and directly impact societal issues pertaining to future energy use and technology. ESM research and modeling tools directly support the Regional and Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) program. In addition, ESM contributes to the Climate Variability and Change element of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and coordinates with climate modeling programs sourced at other federal agencies.

Recent Content

Recent Highlights

Inside a global climate model grid box, wind speeds can have large spatial variability, but such variability is often neglected when calculating wind-driven aerosol particle emissions. There is a need to assess the consequences, and design remedies when this omission leads to the model having...
We developed a four-mode verison of Modal Aerosol Module (MAM4) for better representation of microphysical ageing of primary carbonaceous aerosols in the atmosphere. MAM4 significant increases the near-surface black carbon concentrations in the Arctic and improves the agreement with observ
Although explosive volcanic injections of sulfur into the stratosphere are an important aerosol source, estimates of the climate impact of such aerosols have heretofore been limited to scattering of solar radiation by the aerosols. The effects on clouds after the particles settle into the...
Aerosol particles are the seeds of cloud droplets. Increases in droplet number concentration due to aerosol emissions by human activity can make clouds brighter by reducing droplet size (which increases surface area for the same droplet volume) and by inhibiting precipitation, which allows clouds...
Scientists have to look at today's clouds to understand how they work. But, accurately capturing clouds' impact on the climate in computer climate models has proved to be notoriously difficult. A new study in the Proceedings on the National Academy of Sciences suggests why. Either the models are...

Publications

The critically important at-a-station hydraulic geometry (AHG) relationships relate hydraulic variables (depth, width, or velocity) to discharge in power law form. The recently discovered at-many-stations hydraulic geometry (AMHG) states that AHG exponents and coefficients are strongly correlated...
This paper evaluates the impact of sub-grid variability of surface wind on sea salt and dust emissions in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). The basic strategy is to calculate emission fluxes multiple times, using different wind speed samples of a Weibull probability distribution...
Aerosol–cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure...
Accurate representation of global stratospheric aerosols from volcanic and nonvolcanic sulfur emissions is key to understanding the cooling effects and ozone losses that may be linked to volcanic activity. Attribution of climate variability to volcanic activity is of particular interest in...