Predicting Ice Sheet and Climate Evolution at Extreme Scales (PISCEES)

Principal Investigator(s):

Esmond Ng - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
;
Stephen Price - Los Alamos National Laboratory
;

Project Participant(s):

Collaborative Institutional Lead(s):

Katherine Evans - Oak Ridge National Laboratory
;
Andrew Salinger - Sandia National Laboratory
;
Max Gunzburger - Florida State University
;
Patrick Heimbach - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
;
Lili Ju - University of South Carolina
;
Mariana Vertenstein - National Center for Atmospheric Research
;
Charles Jackson - The University of Texas at Austin
;
Funding Program: 
Earth System Modeling

Melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets is accelerating and the resulting fresh water input into the oceans will be the dominant contribution to future sea level rise as the Earth’s climate changes. The PISCEES project is developing better computer models of large ice sheets to improve future sea level rise projections. In particular, multi-scale formulations of ice sheet dynamics are being implemented to represent the wide range of spatial scales in a robust, accurate and scalable manner. In addition, PISCEES scientists are creating new tools and techniques for validating ice sheet simulation results against observations and providing estimates of the uncertainty surrounding future projections.

Project Term: 
2012-2017
Project Type: 
Laboratory Funded Research

Research Highlights:

None Available

Simulated present-day ice speed (m/yr) for Greenland (left) and with increased basal sliding by factors of 2x and 3x (middle and right, respectively).
Simulated present-day ice speed (m/yr) for Greenland (left) and with increased basal sliding by factors of 2x and 3x (middle and right, respectively).
Top: computed ice velocity for the Antarctic Ice Sheet, with Pine Island Glacier in black box. Bottom: adaptive meshing (shaded boxes) and grounding line location (red line) for the Pine Island Glacier. Regions with a relatively finer mesh track the dynamically complex grounding line region as the simulation evolves.
Top: computed ice velocity for the Antarctic Ice Sheet, with Pine Island Glacier in black box. Bottom: adaptive meshing (shaded boxes) and grounding line location (red line) for the Pine Island Glacier. Regions with a relatively finer mesh track the dynamically complex grounding line region as the simulation evolves.