Biological and Environmental Research - Earth and Environmental System Sciences
Earth and Environmental System Modeling

An Assessment of Global and Regional Sea Level in a Suite of Interannual CORE-II Hindcast Simulations: A Synopsis

TitleAn Assessment of Global and Regional Sea Level in a Suite of Interannual CORE-II Hindcast Simulations: A Synopsis
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsGriffies, Stephen M., Yin Jianjun, Bates Susan C., Behrens Erik, Bentsen Mats, Bi Daohua, Biastoch Arne, Boning Claus, Bozec Alexandra, Casou Christophe, Chassignet Eric, Danabasoglu Gokhan, Danilov Sergey, Domingues Catia, Drange Helge, Durack Paul J., Farneti Riccardo, Fernandez Elodie, Goddard Paul, Greatbatch Richard J., Ilicak Mehmet, Lu Jianhua, Marsland Simon J., Mishra Akhilesh, Lorbacher Katja, Nurser A.J. George, Salas y Melia David, Palter Jaime B., Samuels Bonita L., Schroter Jens, Schwarzkopf Franziska U., Sidorenko Dmitry, Treguier Anne-Marie, Tseng Yu-heng, Tsujino Hiroyuki, Uotila Petteri, Valcke Sophie, Voldoire Aurore, Wang Qiang, Winton Michael, and Zhang Xuebin
JournalExchanges
Volume65
Pages11-15
Abstract / Summary

There are a growing number of observation-based measures of sea level related patterns with the advent of the Argo floats (since the early 2000s) and satellite altimeters (since 1993). These measures provide a valuable means to evaluate aspects of global model simulations, such as the global ocean-sea ice simulations run as part of the interannual Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (Griffies et al., 2009, Danabasoglu et al., 2013). In addition, these CORE-II simulations provide a means for evaluating the likely mechanisms causing sea level variations, particularly when models with different skill are compared against each other and observations. We have conducted an assessment of CORE-II simulations from 13 model configurations (Griffies et al., 2013), with a focus on their ability to capture observed trends in ocean heat content as well as the corresponding dynamic sea level over the period 1993-2007. The CORE-II simulations are designed primarily for studies of interannual variability (Doney et al., 2007, Large and Yeager, 2012). The atmospheric state of Large and Yeager (2009), used as part of the CORE-II air-sea flux calculations, contains interannual satellite-based radiation only after 1983. Over the 15 year period from 1993-2007, observed sea level variations have a large component due to natural variability e.g., Zhang and Church (2012), Meyssignac et al (2012). The CORE-II simulations thus provide a useful means to evaluate interannual variability in ocean-ice models against observations of sea level.

Journal: Exchanges
Year of Publication: 2013
Volume: 65
Pages: 11-15
Publication Date: 08/2013

There are a growing number of observation-based measures of sea level related patterns with the advent of the Argo floats (since the early 2000s) and satellite altimeters (since 1993). These measures provide a valuable means to evaluate aspects of global model simulations, such as the global ocean-sea ice simulations run as part of the interannual Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (Griffies et al., 2009, Danabasoglu et al., 2013). In addition, these CORE-II simulations provide a means for evaluating the likely mechanisms causing sea level variations, particularly when models with different skill are compared against each other and observations. We have conducted an assessment of CORE-II simulations from 13 model configurations (Griffies et al., 2013), with a focus on their ability to capture observed trends in ocean heat content as well as the corresponding dynamic sea level over the period 1993-2007. The CORE-II simulations are designed primarily for studies of interannual variability (Doney et al., 2007, Large and Yeager, 2012). The atmospheric state of Large and Yeager (2009), used as part of the CORE-II air-sea flux calculations, contains interannual satellite-based radiation only after 1983. Over the 15 year period from 1993-2007, observed sea level variations have a large component due to natural variability e.g., Zhang and Church (2012), Meyssignac et al (2012). The CORE-II simulations thus provide a useful means to evaluate interannual variability in ocean-ice models against observations of sea level.

Citation:
Griffies, SM, J Yin, SC Bates, E Behrens, M Bentsen, D Bi, A Biastoch, et al.  2013.  "An Assessment of Global and Regional Sea Level in a Suite of Interannual CORE-II Hindcast Simulations: A Synopsis."  Exchanges 65: 11-15.