Biological and Environmental Research - Earth and Environmental System Sciences
Earth and Environmental System Modeling

Extreme Convective Storms Over High‐Latitude Continental Areas Where Maximum Warming Is Occurring

TitleExtreme Convective Storms Over High‐Latitude Continental Areas Where Maximum Warming Is Occurring
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume46
Number7
Pages4059-4065
Abstract / Summary

Deep convective storms play a key role in severe weather, the hydrological cycle, and the global atmospheric circulation. Historically, little attention has been paid to the intense convective storms in the high latitudes. These regions have been experiencing the largest increases of mean surface temperature over the last century. The Global Precipitation Measurement core satellite, which features a space‐borne Dual‐frequency Precipitation Radar providing near‐global coverage (65°S to 65°N), has made it possible to establish the occurrence of convective storms at high latitudes. Analysis of the three‐dimensional radar echoes seen by Global Precipitation Measurement over a 5‐year period (2014–2018) shows that extremely intense deep convective storms do occur often during the warm season (April–September) in the high‐latitude continents where the increase of surface temperature has been greatest. The associated thermodynamical environments suggest that high‐latitude extreme convection could be more common in a continually warming world.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2019gl082414
DOI10.1029/2019gl082414
Journal: Geophysical Research Letters
Year of Publication: 2019
Volume: 46
Number: 7
Pages: 4059-4065
Publication Date: 04/2019

Deep convective storms play a key role in severe weather, the hydrological cycle, and the global atmospheric circulation. Historically, little attention has been paid to the intense convective storms in the high latitudes. These regions have been experiencing the largest increases of mean surface temperature over the last century. The Global Precipitation Measurement core satellite, which features a space‐borne Dual‐frequency Precipitation Radar providing near‐global coverage (65°S to 65°N), has made it possible to establish the occurrence of convective storms at high latitudes. Analysis of the three‐dimensional radar echoes seen by Global Precipitation Measurement over a 5‐year period (2014–2018) shows that extremely intense deep convective storms do occur often during the warm season (April–September) in the high‐latitude continents where the increase of surface temperature has been greatest. The associated thermodynamical environments suggest that high‐latitude extreme convection could be more common in a continually warming world.

DOI: 10.1029/2019gl082414
Citation:
Houze, R, J Wang, J Fan, S Brodzik, and Z Feng.  2019.  "Extreme Convective Storms Over High‐Latitude Continental Areas Where Maximum Warming Is Occurring."  Geophysical Research Letters 46(7): 4059-4065.  https://doi.org/10.1029/2019gl082414.