Biological and Environmental Research - Earth and Environmental System Sciences
Earth and Environmental System Modeling

Role of AMOC in Transient Climate Response to Greenhouse Gas Forcing in Two Coupled Models

TitleRole of AMOC in Transient Climate Response to Greenhouse Gas Forcing in Two Coupled Models
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
JournalJournal of Climate
Volume33
Number14
Pages5845-5859
Abstract / Summary

As the greenhouse gas concentrations increase, a warmer climate is expected. However, numerous internal climate processes can modulate the primary radiative warming response of the climate system to rising greenhouse gas forcing. Here the particular internal climate process that we focus on is the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), an important global-scale feature of ocean circulation that serves to transport heat and other scalars, and we address the question of how the mean strength of AMOC can modulate the transient climate response. While the Community Earth System Model version 2 (CESM2) and the Energy Exascale Earth System Model version 1 (E3SM1) have very similar equilibrium/effective climate sensitivity, our analysis suggests that a weaker AMOC contributes in part to the higher transient climate response to a rising greenhouse gas forcing seen in E3SM1 by permitting a faster warming of the upper ocean and a concomitant slower warming of the subsurface ocean. Likewise the stronger AMOC in CESM2 by permitting a slower warming of the upper ocean leads in part to a smaller transient climate response. Thus, while the mean strength of AMOC does not affect the equilibrium/effective climate sensitivity, it is likely to play an important role in determining the transient climate response on the centennial time scale.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1175/jcli-d-19-1027.1
DOI10.1175/jcli-d-19-1027.1
Journal: Journal of Climate
Year of Publication: 2020
Volume: 33
Number: 14
Pages: 5845-5859
Publication Date: 07/2020

As the greenhouse gas concentrations increase, a warmer climate is expected. However, numerous internal climate processes can modulate the primary radiative warming response of the climate system to rising greenhouse gas forcing. Here the particular internal climate process that we focus on is the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), an important global-scale feature of ocean circulation that serves to transport heat and other scalars, and we address the question of how the mean strength of AMOC can modulate the transient climate response. While the Community Earth System Model version 2 (CESM2) and the Energy Exascale Earth System Model version 1 (E3SM1) have very similar equilibrium/effective climate sensitivity, our analysis suggests that a weaker AMOC contributes in part to the higher transient climate response to a rising greenhouse gas forcing seen in E3SM1 by permitting a faster warming of the upper ocean and a concomitant slower warming of the subsurface ocean. Likewise the stronger AMOC in CESM2 by permitting a slower warming of the upper ocean leads in part to a smaller transient climate response. Thus, while the mean strength of AMOC does not affect the equilibrium/effective climate sensitivity, it is likely to play an important role in determining the transient climate response on the centennial time scale.

DOI: 10.1175/jcli-d-19-1027.1
Citation:
Hu, A, L Van Roekel, W Weijer, O Garuba, W Cheng, and B Nadiga.  2020.  "Role of AMOC in Transient Climate Response to Greenhouse Gas Forcing in Two Coupled Models."  Journal of Climate 33(14): 5845-5859.  https://doi.org/10.1175/jcli-d-19-1027.1.