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Publication Date
9 March 2022

Geometric Remapping of Particle Distributions in the Discrete Element Model for Sea Ice (DEMSI)

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Disk elements with associated polygons used for remapping
Science

We have developed a new technique to remap a distribution of circular discrete elements, representing sea ice, from a deformed to undeformed distribution, where the deformation may have been caused by sea ice ridging in a discrete element based sea ice model. The method conserves relevant quantities in the particle distribution such as sea ice area, mass, and other conserved tracer quantities.

Impact

This new method is one of the key technologies needed to create a viable discrete element-based sea ice model suitable for global climate applications. The method periodically corrects the build-up of element distortion caused by sea ice deformation and ridging, which would otherwise limit simulation duration.

Summary

We have developed a new technique to remap a distribution of circular discrete elements, representing sea ice, from a deformed to undeformed distribution, where the deformation may have been caused by sea ice ridging in a discrete element based sea ice model. The method conserves relevant quantities in the particle distribution such as sea ice area, mass, and other conserved tracer quantities. This new method is one of the key technologies needed to create a viable discrete element-based sea ice model suitable for long-duration global climate applications. The method periodically corrects the build-up of element distortion caused by sea ice deformation and ridging, which would otherwise limit simulation duration. The method allows the representation of fully covered pack ice by associating a tessellated polygon with each element and uses a more accurate representation of tracers within each element which reduces the numerical diffusion caused by the remapping. The method was tested in a series of idealized test cases, including simple one- and two-dimensional translation as well as sea ice motion in a vortex and around an island.
 

Point of Contact
Adrian K. Turner
Institution(s)
Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)
Funding Program Area(s)
Publication